Content tagged with Connect

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Videoplaza have launched the findings of their study into the world of connected devices exclusively at AdMonsters’ OPS TV in New York on July 11 2012. The report is titled A Future for TV: IP-delivered video advertising in a connected world







It is not a new technique, but technological advances such as Real-Time Bidding (RTB), Data Management Platforms (DMPs) and innovative look-a-like algorithms have transformed audience extension into an impressive revenue opportunity.

As increasing spend flows through programmatic channels, the private exchange concept is considered a boon to both buyers and sellers through enhanced trading controls and inventory transparency. In particular, it’s a convenient way for publishers to better monetize inventory headed to programmatic channels while meeting and exceeding the demands of their top advertisers.

With the swift and continuing evolution of ad operations, the challenges publishers face when evaluating their capabilities abound. Informed decisions on how and where to invest time, money, resources and manpower are often overshadowed by 'gut-feeling' decisions as publishers feel the pressure to maintain a competitive stride.

“What’s up with my fill rate? Why are the video ads loading so slow?”

Those are the two questions publishers really don’t want to be asking themselves when it comes to digital video – especially if they’re dabbling in programmatic waters.

The 2013 edition of the AdMonsters Salary Survey is here! The survey explores over 30 data points on ad operations roles within publishers, agencies, networks and solutions companies from over 310 respondents around the world, and provides data on salaries by position, seniority, geographic area, number of reports, as well as historical trends and other key findings. 

Maybe it’s because I’ve been watching too much “Downton Abbey,” but I can’t shake the idea that if programmatic direct was a debutante, 2013 was the year it came out.

Like a leaky faucet drip-drip-dripping into a steel sink, mobile has long been that nagging concern keeping publishers up at night. The amount of inventory seems to multiply daily with little demand from buyers (especially when it comes buying guaranteed), so publishers are forced to turn to ad networks and programmatic channels for the pennies they can get.

Connect, mobile, video

Viewabilty has been a big topic at AdMonsters events since the term came onto the scene. When the MRC recently rescinded its advisory against transacting on a viewable basis, we wanted to know how much it would affect publishers right then—and in the future.

It’s hard enough overseeing the ad operations tech stack and processes of one publisher; imagine juggling multiple publishers. But that’s exactly the mission companies like Outsourced Ad Ops (OAO) have taken on – and they have to do it well enough to be profitable and grow as a company.

Fifty percent of pixels in view on the in-focus browser tab for two continous seconds. It doesn’t seem like a giant barrier to cross for a video ad to be considered in-view – and that was the point.

For publishers, mobile is an itch spreading over greater sections of skin, tingling more ferociously every second. Scratching doesn’t make it worse, but certainly fails to relieve the symptoms. 

In the past, the acronym CPA had a simple connotation for publishers: low payout. Particularly in the post-bubble digital advertising world, CPA campaigns seemed a desperate alternative when CPMs had hit rock bottom. But more than a decade later, Epom Head of Sales Andrew Lebowski argues that in the age of programmatic and analytics, CPA isn’t yesterday’s “cost per acquisition.”

“This industry is literally 20 years old,” comments Michael Alania, EVP at Outsourced Ad Ops and witness to the at-times insanely rapid evolution of digital advertising and the operations role at its core. “You look at where we are now versus where we’ve come from, it’s pretty staggering. And with how quickly technology is developing and evolving, you have to wonder where we’ll be in another 20 years.” 

“There’s so much waste,” a publisher says with a sigh.

We’re speaking about guaranteeing digital video against panel-based metrics, and one can’t help but shake their head at the amount publishers have to over-deliver to hit demographics. It’s tough to watch a grown ops professional bawl over their lost margins as a result of serving an abundance of free impressions. 

AdMonsters Ad Operations Salary Survey; ad ops salary

Workflow can be the bane of ops' existence. The order’s journey from sales to ops to inventory and other stops can be a perilous one full of treacherous platform crossings and other hazards – it can make Frodo Baggins’ excursion to Mount Doom look like a walk in the park. Teams are stuck entering the same data into multiple systems that simply don’t communicate with each other.

Connect, video

The promise of private marketplaces is both alluring and straightforward. For brands, there’s the opportunity to reach engaged audiences of premium publishers with the efficiency of programmatic. For those premium publishers, there’s an opportunity to move inventory via programmatic, but at significantly higher CPMs than they can net in the open exchanges.

At the beginning of 2015, 90% of U.S. households boasted three or more Internet-connected devices according to Ericsson, with an average of 5.2 devices per house. 

Upfront season seems like it never ends.

Connect, video

Recently the tech media was awash in panic over mobilegeddon – end times were nigh as Google was switching up its search algorithm to favor mobile-friendly responsive design sites.

With additional advertiser budgets pouring into the digital media and advertising technology advancing at a clip, operations’ profile has increased dramatically over the past several years. So now is prime time for publisher revenue specialists to make their voices heard – not just on one issue, but all of them.

Call me a borrower, a copycat or even a thief. Many years ago, Adrian D’Souza led the first AdMonsters session that had a large impact on me, and the outline of his operational process at CNET became the model for building out my department at Advance Digital. To this day I have no regrets about snatching his ideas for my own processes.

I feel like I've been eating, breathing and sleeping programmatic video over the past year. But have no complaints as this has to be one of the most exciting areas in advertising technology. Oh, you think I'm joking? Why don't you download our new playbook on private marketplaces and advanced studies in programmatic video and see who's clowning?

Match every impression with the channel likely to garner the most revenue – seems like the stuff of operational daydreams, but I’m not going to tell you to snap out of it. Such dynamic inventory allocation is real, oh-so-real, and it’s referred to as holistic yield management. I know that sounds like one more piece of empty industry jargon, but it’s actually a pretty appropriate name for what goes on.

The latest wave of advertising is giving me some chilling flashbacks to the age of endless animated MySpace banners, pop-unders and other horrors of the aughts. Instead of learning from that assault of awfulness, digital advertising has somehow grown more intrusive and annoying – in-feed units, auto-play video (with sound?!?!), auto-expanding banners, oh my. 

The tangle of channels that makes up programmatic TV is drawing a lot of attention right now -- and generating a lot of confusion. Traditional TV broadcasters are entering the digital space rapidly, and they're influencing the way digital media is transacted and measured. Meanwhile, broadcasters find digital distribution channels present a whole new set of issues for them.

First-party data raises a huge set of questions for publishers. Some of those questions publishers know they really should ask. Some are questions they hadn't even thought to ask yet. Our latest playbook gets to the answers publishers need to understand and utilize their first-party data, regardless of whether they know how to phrase the questions.

For years and years we’ve been told that if the click isn’t on its deathbed, it should be shivved to death immediately. While early display ads in the mid-90s could boast CTRs above 40%, the likely number you’ll see attached to a campaign these days is below 0.1%. But for some reason, even in 2015, click-through rate remains as vital to digital ad measurement although its importance is widely ridiculed.

There’s a curious thing about DMPs: Publishers generally understand it’s a good idea for them to be aligned with one. A DMP is supposed to help publishers get the most value for their proprietary data, and to pass along the value of its audience extension capabilities to advertisers.

As consumers of digital media, the connected device revolution has been a wonder, giving users the ability to experience the entire Internet virtually whenever, wherever and on whatever they choose. 

For digital publishers, it’s been a bit more of a pain. 

We’re two months past Sept. 1, the date when Google Chrome started detecting and pausing any Flash content it deemed “unimportant” to a page’s main content — in other words, Flash ads. Mozilla’s own Flash-blocking practices preceded Chrome’s, in practice.

And yet, not only has the internet not broken itself, but creatives are still building ads with Flash. So what happened? Why aren’t agencies and publishers getting the message that Flash is dead?


When it comes to media, video is a near universal medium. It’s the foundation of television, the hottest thing on desktop web and an emerging star on smartphones and tablets. And video is video is video on whatever screen it may appear on – for the most part, viewers don’t discriminate, so why should the digital advertising industry? Advertisers love video because it possesses the storytelling qualities of television (sight, sound and motion, baby!) while publishers are enamored with video’s ability to drive engagement and time spent on site (and revenue too, while we’re at it).

Just what is the state of ad ops? It’s complicated. Literally.

If you want to hear about real-life examples of how a historic, trusted but largely regional publication can adapt to and thrive in digital, Ray Faust is one of those people you’d want to talk to. The VP, National and Emerging Sales at the Star Tribune Media Company helped lead the charge into programmatic on the digital properties of this Twin Cities newspaper.

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