Leading Operations Online

A little over a month ago, Vizio settled for $2.2 million with the FTC after an investigation into its data collection practices. In the settlement, the TV-maker agreed to collect future data only when users opt in. However, Vizio is still facing a class action lawsuit based on VPPA (Video Privacy Protection Act).

The dispute is over Vizio’s ”Smart Interactivity” feature in its smart TVs, which enables content suggestions and offers for users. Vizio had collected data around users’ viewing habits and matched it to users’ demographic data (age, sex, income, marital status, education level and so on) without getting explicit user consent—then turned around and sold that data to data platforms, ad tech providers and agencies.

According to...

Call it a browser cookie, a web cookie, an HTTP cookie—it’s all the same thing, just a small text file, not even executable code. A cookie takes the form of a name-value pair (e.g. name=value). Originally designed to recall information like logins, form data and shopping cart contents, they’ve been a core component of digital advertising since the '90s. The industry has historically relied on cookies to do audience targeting, determine which creative to serve, handle frequency capping and perform many other functions.

When a user visits a website for the first time (or the first time since the user has cleared their browser history), the site sends a cookie to the user, and it’s stored on their device by the browser. As such, cookies are browser-specific, so if you’re running Chrome on one device and Firefox on another, you’re dealing with two different sets of cookies. When the user returns to that...

If you're in digital, you're more or less destined to be on Facebook and Google. The major platforms have unparalleled scale. But they're certainly not the be-all and end-all to digital--and publishers would love for advertisers to agree on this point. Publishers are sitting on valuable audience insights of their own, outside of the massive platforms' infamous walled gardens. Those publishers know they need make those insights scale, and then communicate to advertisers how much that scale and depth of data is worth.

We've spoken with LiveIntent fairly recently about how publishers can ply their audience data toward the kind of one-to-one, people-based marketing advertiers crave. Earlier in 2017, LiveIntent teamed up with self-styled "identity resolution provider...

“I hate the term header bidding,” a friend and industry resource told me over a cold beer. “It’s too catchy—it sounds like another piece of ad-tech buzzword BS.”

I’d argue “tagless tech”—the first name I heard in reference to header-based executions—was far worse (and horribly untrue). But my friend’s dislike really stems from the ad tech industry’s tendency to latch onto a term and flail it anywhere and everywhere until it’s completely drained of all meaning. It makes something revolutionary sound like a pittance, and encourages reactionaries to dismiss a seismic shift as merely a fad.

No, the header insurgency (and header bidding is just one flavor) is something far more substantial, banishing the contrived waterfall in favor of real, nearly level markets. For those who have been watching, that’s a first for the programmatic trading space, although it was always the ideal...

March 6, 2017 Brian LaRue

AdMonsters new and old have assembled for another heady three and a half days of ops education and commiseration at the 41st Publisher Forum. This time, we're in Palm Springs, CA, in palm tree-studded valley surrounded by beautiful but forbidding mountain ranges. In other words, it's a lot like ops, minus the palm trees.

Watch this spot throughout Monday and Tuesday, March 6-7. We'll be live blogging from the main room here at the Omni Rancho Las Palmas, bringing you a minute-by-minute report of keynotes, the State of Ad Ops, the Digital Media Leadership Awards winners' panel, and anything else that happens in front of the full group.

Approaching 9 a.m. on Monday, AdMonsters Chairman Rob Beeler is about to take to the dais to welcome the group and introduce PubForum 41's first keynote speaker, TEN (The Enthusiast Network) CEO Scott Dickey. Scott's keynote, very timely considering how cross-platform distribution is shaping media consumption and the broader discourse in society at large right now, is called "Game of Platforms: How Publishers...

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