Leading Operations Online

The IAB held a call this week to present its latest Internet Advertising Report, developed from a semi-annual survey conducted by PricewaterhouseCoopers. And the way the numbers sorted out, it became clear that 2016 was the year of… wait for it, this might be a shock…

MOBILE!

Kidding aside, we all know how this sounds. During the call, PwC Director Peter Stubbs said playfully that after several years of people declaring this year the year of mobile, “I think, thank god, this is the year we’ve made it.” And the IAB/PwC analysis asserted that mobile ad spend seriously exploded year-over-year in 2016—with mobile usage driving spend in video, social media, search, display, even audio.

Let’s lay out some of the key numbers here, and keep in mind this all pertains to the U.S. market specifically. Total digital ad spend was up 22% YOY in 2016, to $72.2 billion. Mobile accounted for 51% of digital...

I found it bizarre that the same day that the IAB released digital advertising revenue numbers for 2016 that point to Google and Facebook—the Duopoly!—vacuuming up about half of ad spend and almost all of growth, ESPN conducted layoffs of 100 mainly editorial employees

As several sites noted, most of those affected were longtime, trusted beat reporters. I couldn’t help flashing back to newspapers slashing similar types of writers as print revenues dried up.

ESPN is in a very different situation, and it’s really being hurt by cord cutters like me. A lot of the network’s revenue is made up of carriage...

Single-request architecture is a setup where, in a header bidding framework, the bidder sends one call to the ad server for multiple ad slots, and the server returns bids for all of those ad slots at the same time.

To explain why single-request might be advantageous to the publisher, and to the buyer/bidder, we should put it in context and explain multi-request architecture briefly. When header bidding adoption was on the rise, multi-request architecture was pretty common. With the multi-request arrangement, when the user loads the page, there’s essentially one auction that fires off for each of the ad slots on the page. As Andrew Casale from Index Exchange explained to AdMonsters in an interview at the end of 2016, this means that if you have four slots, the page initiates four requests (simple enough). But if there are five header bidders integrated on the site, each of those bidders will make an individual call for each of those...

Is true programmatic reporting a pipe dream, or is it within reach? Tough question--we can lay out a road map to a programmatic reporting ideal, but it's easy to see how there might be a lot of twists and turns along that road. For a publisher, getting all the data from all your demand sources is a challenge in itself. Once the data is through the door, you're still facing the process of normalizing it so you can take meaningful action.

No reason to fear, though--Peter Yang, COO of Ad-Juster, is willing to offer some driving tips to publishers winding down the road to programmatic reporting. He and AdMonsters' Gavin Dunaway spoke recently about how publishers can manage the data disparity they see--and about the need for transparency on all sides, the role of technological toolsets in collecting and normalizing data, and the importance of knowing your own goals well enough to take action on those data insights.

GAVIN...

With Oracle’s recent purchase of Moat, one of the more widely-integrated third-party measurement companies out there, the term "Intersection Observer" has been thrown around a lot lately. To some, the Intersection Observer has been put forward as the possible driver of the next generation of viewability measurement, and as the tool that may pull the industry away from reliance on third-party measurement companies. The discrepancies between measurement vendors are a common industry-wide pain point, a key part of why the discussion about viewability seems to have reached a standstill (at least from some perspectives).

So what is the Interesction Observer, anyway? It’s an API native to the browser, currently available in Chrome and Edge, with Firefox and Safari reportedly developing their own. From a development...

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